Tavish: Faster than a Speeding Airplane?

FASTER

Faster than a flying Orville? Why, yes! Tavish covered the famous “first flight” distance of 120 feet in about half the time it took Orville Wright to fly it — without even breaking into a pant.

In this post we’re seeing if Intrepid Pup Tavish is faster than an airplane. Well, not just any airplane. More specifically: whether he’s faster than the first airplane. And to do that, we head to Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina, where brothers Orville and Wilbur Wright first achieved powered, controlled, and sustained human flight on December 17, 1903 at 10:35 AM.

The site was a relatively remote coastal area when the Wrights were here more than a century ago, and they’d specifically chosen it because they could experiment without a lot of distractions and—presumably—prying eyes. The dune environment also afforded fairly consistent breezes and sandy landings to boot. After all, laying claim to being the first in flight was very much a risky venture!

Today Kill Devil Hills is a big draw for beach-goers to the Outer Banks, and the Wrights’ humble proving ground is now managed by the National Park Service as the Wright Brothers National Memorial.

A short distance from the Visitor Center is a large granite boulder commemorating the spot where Orville took flight. A pathway extends from it, and four markers along the way show the ever-increasing distances the Wrights successfully flew that momentous morning. To better Orville’s historic first flight, Tavish would have to cover 120 feet in less than 12 seconds. Complicating matters was that 1) park regulations dictated that Tavish needed to remain on a leash, and 2) a preponderance of prickly pear cacti in the field meant he also had to stay on the straight and narrow! In fact, Tavish had already managed to step on a prickly pear earlier in his visit, so he wasn’t eager for a repeat.

With one member of Team Tavish holding the leash and the other standing at the 120-foot mark with the stopwatch app primed on a smartphone (my, how far technology has come!), Tavish was literally straining to get going. But could he do it? In a word? Yes. Handily. The Intrepid Pup didn’t exactly break the sound barrier that pilot Chuck Yeager would end up doing a mere 44 years after Orville severed the bonds of earth…but, boy, did Tavish hustle! Final time? 5.89 seconds. And Park Ranger Shafer even handed us a little card to record the achievement (see above). Mission accomplished. Actually, seeing Tavish sprint across aviation’s sacred ground really put things in perspective: only a handful of generations ago, powered flight was inconceivable and now we don’t even think twice about boarding an airplane and jet-setting around the globe.

WrightBrothersFlyer

Tavish gets an Orville-eye-view of Kill Devil Hills from Stephen Smith’s life-size sculpture, December 17, 1903.

In March of 1917—more than 13 years after his first flight and just five after his brother Wilbur’s untimely demise from typhoid, Orville got a dog: a St. Bernard named Scipio. (We always knew Orville was a cool guy). Fortunately the Library of Congress has 13 marvelous photographs of Scipio, and it leaves us to wonder:  Did Scipio ever sense his owner’s lofty achievements? And could he, too, run faster than a flying Orville?

 

 

 

Click to see what a "1" on the Wag-a-meter meansDogging the Details

36° 0′ 51.20″ N,  75° 40′ 4.40″ W
Wright Brothers National Memorial
, Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina (milepost 7.5)

A visit to the Wright Brothers National Memorial scores a “1” on the Intrepid Pup wag-a-meter for providing a fun, outdoor experience on a very historic site. There’s a nominal park entrance fee, but there’s waaaay more to do than just test whether you can outrun the first airplane. Take in everything the park has to offer, and you’ll easily cover approximately 1.5 miles with your dog.

Wright Brothers hangar

A reconstructed replica of the Wrights’ hangar provides some welcome shade for the Intrepid Pup.

If you’re going in the summer months—as we did—be aware that the grounds are exposed and can get very hot. Bring along water for your pup; there are restrooms and drinking fountains onsite for a refill. Shade is hard to come by, but Tavish found some in the replica of the Wrights’ hangar. Be sure to trek up Big Kill Devil Hill to get a panorama of the park but also a view to the sea. This promontory was where the Wrights logged thousands of glider flights testing their theories on how best to control pitch and yaw. It’s topped by an impressive 60-foot granite shaft erected by Congress and dedicated in 1932. By the time we got to the monument, it was high noon and pretty toasty, so Tavish’s Ruffwear Swamp Cooler ™ Vest  provided him extra comfort.

Wright Brothers monument

Crowning Big Kill Devil Hill is a monument to the Wright brothers’ crowning achievement, “the conquest of the air.”

Before turning back to further explore the Visitor Center or catch a ranger program, head downhill beyond the memorial. At the apex of the loop road  is a five-ton bronze and stainless steel sculpture group by Stephen Smith entitled, December 17, 1903. It captures that exact instant of first flight preserved in a photograph known the world over. In fact, it makes for a pretty great backdrop for taking some photos of your own (see below).

Finally, there are even more places to explore with your pup within easy distance of the Wright Brothers National Memorial. Check out the Intrepid Pup’s earlier post, “Summer Fun: 5 Dog-Friendly OBX Destinations” for a few suggestions!

Sculpture by Stephen Smith

The hand of “Wilbur Wright” holds the leash that includes the Intrepid Pup in this now-famous scene. Sensing that they’d be successful on December 17, 1903, the Wrights wanted to photograph the instant the flyer left the ground. They set up a tripod, and Orville asked bystander John Daniels if he’d man the camera. (No pressure, there, right?) The rest is history. Better yet? It was the first time Daniels had ever used a camera!

“Bark Upon the Gale”: Adventures on D.O.G. Street

Colonial Capitol

For 81years, Williamsburg was the seat of Virginia government. It was in this Colonial Capitol building on May 15, 1776, that it was proposed to “declare the United Colonies free and independent states.” The rallying cry, taken up by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, led to the Declaration of the Independence.

Extending just shy of a mile between Williamsburg, Virginia’s Colonial Capitol and the steps of the historic Wren Building is the primarily pedestrian-only thoroughfare known as Duke of Gloucester Street.  Abbreviated to just “D.O.G. Street” by the locals, it’s coincidentally also a great place for experiencing America’s colonial history with your dog.

Preservation and restoration of the downtown’s 18th-century buildings began in 1926 with the financial backing of John D. Rockefeller, Jr.  Opened to the public in 1932, Colonial Williamsburg today constitutes the nation’s largest living history museum.  Costumed interpreters stroll the streets, bringing the “Revolutionary City” to life for some 1.5 million visitors a year.

Begin your visit at the Colonial Williamsburg Visitor Center.  Pets aren’t allowed on the shuttle buses, but it’s only about a quarter-mile walk on a wooded path from the Visitor Center to the heart of the historic district. The walkway comes out near the Governor’s Palace, approximately halfway down D.O.G. Street.  Keep in mind that if you want to go inside certain buildings you’ll need to go solo (and buy a ticket), but otherwise it’s a dog-walking feast for the senses.  Lots of bonnets, tricorn hats, and horse-drawn carriages. Kids perfecting their hoop-rolling technique on the palace lawn. Sheep munching away in their pens. Colorful gardens. You might even talk with “Patrick Henry” or “George Washington.”  We found many of the colonials eager to engage, and Tavish got his share of head rubs as we made the rounds past Bruton Parish, the Courthouse and the Colonial Capitol.

Wren Building

Tavish sprawls in the shadow of the Lord Botetourt statue on the grounds of the Wren Building, the oldest academic building in continuous use in the United States.

Nearing lunchtime, Team Tavish headed to Merchants Square at the far western end of D.O.G. Street and ordered take-out from storied The Cheese Shop. Seriously, this place has been fueling the masses since 1971.  In a not-so-scientific taste test, Tavish always approves of the roast beef and cheddar sandwich with “house dressing,” The Cheese Shop’s signature condiment. While patio seating in the Square is an option, do you and your dog a favor and take your picnic lunch to where the tourists aren’t: just across the street at The College of William & Mary.

To borrow—with a bit of poetic license—from the chorus of William & Mary’s alma mater, here’s your chance to “hark (or bark?!) upon the gale” and check out the campus of this Virginia state school. Thanks to a 1693 charter from King William III and Queen Mary II of England, the College is the second-oldest in America and is the academic home for approximately 6,200 undergrads and 2,000 graduate students. Famous alumni of this “Public Ivy” are as diverse as Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Monroe and Tyler; actress Glenn Close; NFL coach Mike Tomlin; and “Daily Show” host Jon Stewart.

Crim Dell

Tavish mugs for the camera at the College’s picturesque Crim Dell. “Legend” has it that if lovers kiss as they cross the footbridge, they’re destined for marriage…indeed, many a wedding proposal has taken place here. Romance aside, all degree candidates walk over the bridge as part of a final processional through campus preceding each commencement ceremony.

The oldest part of campus abuts Colonial Williamsburg and features a triumvirate of stately brick buildings:  the Sir Christopher Wren Building (it holds the distinction of being the nation’s oldest academic building), the President’s House (yes, the College president really lives there), and The Brafferton (formerly an “Indian School”). To embark on about a mile-long walking tour loop of campus, take the brick path around to the other side of the Wren Building and be rewarded by a vista of the Sunken Gardens, a grassy common where you’re likely to find students studying or sunbathing. Walk down James Blair Drive on the right, and you’ll pass the Campus Center and catch a glimpse of Zable Stadium where William & Mary’s Division I  football team plays. As the drive curves and slopes downhill to the left, glance across the pond for a view of Crim Dell; it’s consistently in contention as the most-photographed spot on any college campus. Glance to your right and you’ll notice a small amphitheater and the entrance to the Wildflower Refuge. If you take this shaded path and eventually bear to the left, it comes out across from Swem Library. Turn left and follow Landrum Drive past Barksdale Field and various academic buildings and dormitories until it connects with Jamestown Road. Make one final left, and hug the sidewalk, walking along the backside of more dorms…you’ll be back at the Wren Building in no time!

 

Click to see what a "1" on the Wag-a-meter means

Governor's Palace

Tavish stands tall at the gates of the Governor’s Palace in Colonial Williamsburg. The original structure dated to 1722 and was home to seven royal governors, plus Patrick Henry and Thomas Jefferson.

Dogging the Details

37°16′34.18″ N,  76°41′41.09″ W
Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia

Chalk up a “1” on the Intrepid Pup wag-a-meter for Colonial Williamsburg! Having your dog along means you won’t be able to enter ticketed areas like the Governor’s Palace and garden, some 22 sites where interpreters are plying their 18th-century trades, or many of the historic dining taverns. However, exploring the general historic area is free, and if the weather is pleasant, you’ll find it readily walkable, and there’s no shortage of things to see. You can quite literally cover a lot of ground in just an afternoon. Although Colonial Williamsburg is attractive in any season, the summer months tend to be hot and humid, so be sure to keep your pup and yourself plenty hydrated.

WilliamsburgAlewerks

As of October 2013, expansion plans for AleWerks’ existing microbrewery and tasting room/retail shop call for pet-friendly outdoor seating and a “taproom” offering light snacks.

If your dog is spooked by loud noises, be mindful of when the colonial militia is doing artillery demonstrations on the grounds.  A confession: Tavish the Intrepid Pup is completely unfazed by fireworks and thunderstorms, but he categorically abhors smoke—be it from a grill, a cigarette, a car’s tailpipe, or a musket salute (Tavish once held up an entire parade because of this, but that’s another story).  So while Tavish was fine with the cannon firing near the colonial Magazine during our visit, he was completely undone by the ensuing cannon smoke that was drifting our way, and we had to beat a hasty retreat upwind.

Finally, are you looking to extend your excursion? Two other nearby points making up the region’s “Historic Triangle” are Historic Jamestowne (the 1607 site of the first permanent, colonial English settlement in North America) and Yorktown Battlefield (where the Revolutionary War ended in 1781 with the British surrender to General Washington).  Both welcome leashed dogs in the outdoor areas.  And if you do end up venturing further afield, you’re going to need additional sustenance. Might we suggest AleWerks Brewing Company? Located on the outskirts of town in an industrial park, Williamsburg’s (only) microbrewery came onto the American craft beer scene in 2006.  Another edge-of-town option is Pierce’s PITT Bar-B-Que, a long-time establishment based on a secret family recipe. From the comfort of the outdoor picnic tables, your dog can happily score a couple of samples from your hickory-smoked, down-home meal…just like Tavish did!

Summer Fun: 5 Dog-Friendly OBX Destinations

Tavish on the beach by Jennette's Pier

OBX:  three little letters stand for North Carolina’s Outer Banks and a summer full of fun for dogs and people alike. Many locations along the Outer Banks are denoted simply by their milepost number along U.S. Highway 158.  At Whalebone Junction, the road becomes a decidedly less-congested N.C. Route 12 and is the gateway to Cape Hatteras, designated the country’s first national seashore in 1953. Beaches are dog-friendly, with regulations varying by town and season. Here are the Intrepid Pup’s picks for the top five scenic and sandy spots at this east coast playground:

Bodie Island Light Station

After wandering the grounds, be sure to follow the 1/8-mile boardwalk through the marsh for a picture-perfect view.

35° 49′ 5.30″ N,  75° 33′ 51.53″ W
Bodie Island Light Station
, Bodie Island, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina
Open March – December

Throughout the centuries, the storms and shoals defining this stretch of coastline have wrecked more than 600 ships. Were it not for the area’s lighthouses and lifesaving services, this Graveyard of the Atlantic would have claimed even more. Don’t miss Bodie Island Light Station, the 164.4-foot black and white striped beacon whose light is visible from 19 miles at sea. Constructed in 1872, it’s actually the third light station to occupy that approximate location. Since 2000, it’s been maintained by the National Park Service, and you can even take a ranger-led tour up the tower.  While dogs aren’t currently allowed inside the light station, that wasn’t always the case. A Chesapeake Bay Retriever named Chess used to climb the tower every day, accompanying his master Vernon Gaskill who served as Bodie Island’s last civilian-era keeper (1919-1939).  According to Elinor De Wire’s book, The Lightkeepers’ Menagerie—on sale in the light station’s gift shopChess had no problem with the heights but apparently drew the line at entering the lantern room, because he didn’t like the odor of kerosene!

Tavish at the Lost Colony

The emptiness here adds to the mystery and kind of proves a point. After all, it is the Lost Colony.

35° 56′ 9.79″ N,  75° 42′ 35.35″ W
Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, Roanoke Island, North Carolina
Open year-round

A newly renovated visitor center at this National Park Service site interprets the history of Roanoke Island, from Algonquian homeland in the 1500s to a refuge for runaway slaves during the Civil War. But the spot is perhaps best known for what it wasn’t, namely a successful English colony. In fact, no one knows for certain what became of the English settlers who’d arrived in 1587.  When Governor John White returned to check on his transplants to the New World three years later, the 117 colonists plus White’s ill-fated granddaughter Virginia Dare (the first Christian baby born in Virginia) seemed to have vanished into thin air.  An abandoned fort and the word “CROATOAN” carved into a post are the scant clues in this unsolved mystery.

You, too, can explore the grounds of the lost colony. Pass a reconstructed version of the original earthen fort and join up with the Hariot Nature Trail for what amounts to about a 20-minute walk. We came upon a flock of ibises unhurriedly picking their way through the clearing. The wooded trail is slightly overgrown in spots and is punctuated by markers identifying types of trees and habitats. Sprinkled in are quotes drawn from accounts in Old English affirming the myriad challenges that the colonists faced. The trail provides a  picturesque view of Albemarle Sound before circling back to the Visitor Center.  Let us know if you happen to make the separate 2.5-mile round-trip hike on the Freedom Trail out to Croatan Sound—we were unfortunately thwarted in our attempt by a severe thunderstorm!

NagsHeadBeach

The Intrepid Pup officially “off duty” on the beaches of Nags Head.

35° 54′ 36.32″ N,  75° 35′ 43.77″ W
Nags Head Beaches & Jennette’s Pier, Nags Head, North Carolina (milepost 16.5)

Cape Hatteras National Seashore and the towns of Duck, Kill Devil Hills, Kitty Hawk, Nags Head, and Southern Shores all permit dogs on their beaches with varying degrees of seasonal access and leash laws. Team Tavish and the Intrepid Pup particularly like the beaches in Nags Head, because dogs are allowed on the beach year-round and at any time of day so long as they are on a maximum 10-ft leash and owners clean up.

Jennette's Pier

A bronze sea turtle stands watch by the pier house on Jeannette’s Pier.

While Tavish loves the water, he isn’t big on swimming, and that’s actually just fine here, because one does have to be mindful of the dangerous rip currents that can lurk offshore. But the beaches are clean and wide…perfect for an Intrepid Pup to snuffle the sand, poke at shells, crabs and seaweed, and skitter through the foamy surf. Walk the beach at sunrise and you’re sure to catch glimpses of skimming pelicans and playful porpoises offshore. Hard to miss at the heart of the beach’s Whalebone District is Jennette’s Pier (see photo at top). It’s been at this location since 1939, and  its current iteration is all concrete and extends 1,000 feet  into the Atlantic Ocean. Dogs aren’t permitted in or beyond the pier house, but you can get as far as the oversize bronze sculpture of a sea turtle. From that vantage point you can watch all the anglers heading out onto the pier to catch bluefish, cobia, skate, pigfish, mackerel, sea mullet, and more.

Tavish at Jockey's Ridge

The dunes at this state park are very cool…just be mindful of your dog’s paws, because the sand can get hot, hot, HOT!

35° 57′ 50.37″ N,  75° 37′ 59.38″ W
Jockey’s Ridge State Park
, Nags Head, North Carolina (milepost 12)
Open year-round

Did you know that this 420-acre state park represents the eastern United States’ largest natural dune system? It’s open to the public year-round, though park hours vary by season. Parking and general access are free. Dogs are allowed, so long as they remain on 6-foot leashes. From the visitor center, you can stroll a 360-foot boardwalk to a dune overlook, set out on the 1.5-mile “Tracks in the Sand” interpretive trail, take a mile-long walk on the “Soundside” nature trail…or simply scale the dunes. The shifting sands create a ridge that varies in height from 80 to 100 feet, providing spectacular views of the Atlantic Ocean and Roanoke Sound. With fairly steady prevailing winds, Jockey’s Ridge is a favorite destination for kiteboarders and sandboarders. On the morning of our visit, hang gliding lessons were just getting underway, and the park was also gearing up for a big kite festival. We’d been forewarned that the sand at Jockey’s Ridge can get anywhere from 10 to 30 degrees hotter than the air temperature, so Tavish came prepared wearing his Ruffwear Swamp Cooler™ vest (a real godsend that made all the difference in his comfort in the dry heat), and he had his protective paw booties at the ready.  A word to the wise:  try taking off your shoes. If it’s too hot to walk on the dunes barefoot, it’ll definitely be too hot for your pup!  When we reached the ridge, the radio announcer for the kite festival approached us to pet  Tavish. Taking stock of all of our water bottles and gear, he remarked, “Wow, I can’t tell you how many people I see come up here with no water for themselves, let alone for their dogs. Big mistake.”

Tavish Wright Brothers National Memorial

The sky’s the limit at the Wright Brothers National Memorial!

36° 0′ 51.20″ N,  75° 40′ 4.40″ W
Wright Brothers National Memorial
, Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina (milepost 7.5)
Open year-round

Modern aviation is indebted to two Ohio brothers who journeyed to what at the turn-of-the 20th century was a remote patch of dunes. Carefully chosen for the winds, lack of distractions, and sandy landings, Kill Devil Hills was where Orville and Wilbur Wright first achieved powered, controlled, and sustained human flight on December 17, 1903.  You can follow in the brothers’ flight path with a visit to this National Park Service memorial. With Tavish in tow, we covered a total of approximately 1.5 miles walking the grounds. A pathway with stone markers traces the trajectories and landings of the Wrights’ first four powered flights. Trek uphill to get a panorama of the site, topped by a 60-foot granite memorial; it’s the same promontory from which the Wrights had earlier experimented with glider flights. Before turning back to further explore the informative Visitor Center, head downhill beyond the memorial. At the apex of the trail loop is a bronze and stainless steel sculpture group entitled, December 17, 1903. It captures the same instant of first flight as the iconic photograph and makes for a pretty nifty photo opp all its own!

Dogging the Details

Click to see what 2 on the Wag-A-Meter meansYou see a lot of dogs on the Outer Banks enjoying outdoor activities a-plenty. So at first we were puzzled by the fact that dog-friendly lodging and dining weren’t as abundant. It turns out that many dog-owning OBX vacationers rent beach houses by the week (Sunday to Saturday) so they’re not needing as many hotels and always have the option of cooking in.  That being said, there are approximately a dozen pet-friendly overnight accommodations. We stayed at the Dolphin Oceanfront Motel (milepost 16.5), finding it to be minimalist but functional, with its key attribute being that it had a primo location right on the beach. By no means inexpensive, it was still comparatively less pricey than the pet-friendly rooms at the national hotel chains and some of the local B&Bs.

Tavish at the Front Porch Cafe

Chillaxing at the Front Porch Cafe

Foodwise, we stopped at a couple places with patio dining only to discover that dogs weren’t allowed.  We hit the jackpot, though, in finding the Front Porch Cafe for breakfast. We ate at their locations in Nags Head (milepost 10.5) and Kill Devil Hills (milepost 6). In addition to making a good cup o’ joe, they have a wide assortment of muffins, pastries, and breakfast sandwiches. We sat outside in roomy Adirondack chairs, and the staff was quick to offer Tavish dog biscuits and a bowl of water.  Pigman’s Bar-B-Que was our other find. We took our order out to their picnic tables, and Tavish happily sampled our Carolina-style Que, hush puppies, fries, slaw, baked beans, and cornbread. OBX ranks a “2” on the Intrepid Pup’s wag-a-meter for providing enough canine fun in the sun, sand and surf to blow Tavish’s ears back! Grab a leash and go!

Four Ways to Savor the End of Summer with your Dog

Lounging

Don’t throw in the towel on summer just yet: Tavish the Intrepid Pup has—count ’em—FOUR great ideas for eking out the last bits of summer fun.

Labor Day Weekend is upon us, officially signaling that summer is drawing to a close. But just because the sun is setting earlier and the number of BBQs is dwindling doesn’t mean there isn’t still fun to be had. To that end, Tavish the Intrepid Pup has picked four can’t-miss activities to help you and your dog savor these last days of summer and tide you over ’til next year.

Click to see what a 3 on the Wag-A-Meter meansEach of these tops out the Intrepid Pup’s wag-a-meter at a “3” not only for being canine-specific but also for being fun for dogs and people alike. While they all happen to take place within the greater metropolitan DC area, Team Tavish suspects that there are similar events elsewhere in the country…let us know in the comments section below!

 

Canine Cruise

Ahoy! Tavish spent the whole Canine Cruise facing into the breeze.

Canine Cruise with Potomac Riverboat Company, Alexandria, Virginia
38°48′18.40″N,  77°2′22.99″W

Only two more cruise dates remain in the 2012 season: Thursday 9/6/12 and Thursday 9/13/12 at 7PM and 8PM, weather permitting

Here’s your chance to get out on the water! The Potomac Riverboat Company offers a whole host of water taxi services and scenic tours along the Potomac, but this one is billed especially for dogs. Board the double-decked, open-air Admiral Tilp from the Alexandria Dock at the base of Cameron Street; look for the dog-friendly drinking fountain near the gangplank! Though you’ll have to purchase a ticket ($15/adult; $9/child, reservations are suggested), your dog rides for free and usually even receives a complimentary dog biscuit from the crew!

There were approximately six other dogs sharing the upper deck with us on the evening of our 40-minute excursion. It was typical, sultry end-of-summer weather, so the light breeze off the water was welcome. The captain pointed out the highlights and shared a few pieces of trivia, but otherwise this was not a highly narrated affair. You’ll head as far south as the impressive Woodrow Wilson Bridge and as far upriver as Bolling Air Force Base. Along the way there are lovely views of Old Town and National Airport on the Virginia shore and National Harbor and the Naval Research Laboratory on the Maryland side.

Dogs are required to be on 6-foot flat leashes.

Dog Swim

Tavish prefers wading and splashing to actual swimming but had an absolute blast at last year’s Dog Swim at NVRPA’s Great Waves Waterpark.

Dog Swim at NVRPA Waterparks
38°48′18.04″N,  77°6′1.56″W
Saturday 9/8/12 – Noon to 4PM

On the final day of the season before the pools get drained, all five of the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority’s waterparks go to the dogs! Although the “rides” and slides are off limits, there’s plenty of action to be found in the wave pool, play areas, giant bubblers, and waterfalls. Come prepared to fill out a waiver/registration form and to pay the entry fee of $5 per dog. Once you pass through the security gates you can let your dog off leash, but be sure to keep your dog in view. Remember to bring a towel, doggie bags, fresh water for your dog to drink…and a camera! The sight of all those dogs racing around and grinning away (easily 50 at any given time) was priceless!

Though you may be tempted to join in the frolicking, only dogs are allowed in the water on the Dog Swim afternoon. And one final tip, shared from personal experience:  As your dog careens through the pools, be mindful of his toenails and paw pads, since the concrete decking can rapidly wear them to the quick or cause a tear. If your dog is due for a nail trim, don’t do it right before the Dog Swim.

NPS tour

Fala, you sly dog, you! Tavish poses with the bronze statue of Fala, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s famed Scottish terrier and confidante, at the FDR Memorial. It’s the only presidential memorial to include a pet.

Presidential Dogs and Four-Legged American Heroes Tour, beginning at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial, Washington, DC
38°53′2.24″N,  77°2′38.89″W

Upcoming dates are Sunday 9/9/12, Sunday 9/16/12, and Saturday 9/29/12, beginning at 5PM…plus a couple dates in October TBA, beginning at 4PM.

How better to explore man’s best friends’ contributions to our nation than via DC’s national memorials? Well-behaved, leashed dogs are welcome on this innovative (and free!) walking tour led by a National Park Service ranger. This particular tour is a relatively new offering—the first one was a month ago— and is rapidly growing in popularity. The tour convenes at the bookstore at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and, fortunately, finding late-afternoon weekend parking nearby on Ohio Drive isn’t impossible. In about 90 minutes’ time, you’ll cover approximately 1.5 miles at a leisurely pace, with built-in stops for water breaks and dog treats. Ranger Eddy Kahle readily held the attention of our multi-generational group consisting of 10 people and 5 dogs. Brimming with anecdotes and a dog-owner himself, Kahle is clearly passionate about the important role pets play in our lives. You’ll learn which president had the most pets in the White House (hint: one was a pygmy hippo!), who had a pair of beagles named “Him” and “Her”, and what dog joined the president on his morning jogs. As the tour moves away from the Tidal Basin and toward the war memorials, the focus shifts to the role of dogs in wartime and their value to returning veterans.

For your dog, bring along doggie bags, fresh water and a 6-foot leash. For you? Don’t forget a camera. After all, how else are you going to get that requisite photo of your dog alongside a super-sized Fala immortalized in bronze?

Yappy Hour

Tavish discovered that the Hotel Monaco’s open-air courtyard is a pretty happenin’ place.

Doggie Yappy Hour at the Hotel Monaco, Alexandria, Virginia
38°53′2.24″N,  77°2′38.89″W

5PM on Tuesday and Thursday evenings through October, weather permitting

One of the very first dog owners we met the winter we moved to northern Virginia told us point blank, “Come April, you must go to the Hotel Monaco.” That’s when the boutique hotel opens its brick courtyard for the much-anticipated Doggie Yappy Hours that take place every Tuesday and Thursday evenings all the way through October.

The ground rules are simple: no more than 2 dogs per handler, no paws on the tables, and dogs must be on 6-foot leashes and have current rabies tags. There’s a good vibe, and the people/canine-watching is pretty sublime. It’s not uncommon for the café tables and cushioned wicker sofas to be filled to capacity, with close to 25 dogs of all breed and sizes (plus a few adoptable dogs from the Animal Welfare League of Alexandria) lounging alongside. Hotel Monaco staffers are quick to accommodate with water bowls and complimentary dog treats. There’s no cover charge, but don’t think you won’t need a wallet. There’s an eclectic mix of non-draft craft beers available from the outdoor bartender. Wait staff will help you choose from a tasty selection of small plate “new American tavern” dishes from the hotel’s Jackson 20 menu. (Think fried green tomatoes, BBQ sliders, shrimp fritters, waffle fries with pulled pork and smoked gouda…yum!)

If you time it right on a Thursday, you can have drinks and appetizers at the Yappy Hour and then walk the three blocks down to the waterfront to catch the Canine Cruise described above.

In the Pursuit of Lobster

Maine Lobsterman StatueEvery year National Lobster Day is celebrated by foodies across America on June 15. While the origins of this “holiday” remain as murky as the waters in which lobsters thrive, there’s no doubting that the observance makes for a great excuse to don a bib and indulge in fresh lobster and drawn butter!

Being from Maine, the Intrepid Pup has seen his share of lobster boats, traps, and buoys. The Maine Lobstermen’s Association—the largest commercial fishing industry group on the east coast, representing the interests of more than 1,200 lobstermen—is even headquartered in what was once his home community! So when Team Tavish learned that the nation’s capital contains a lobster statue, we knew this was a destination for the Intrepid Pup!

The Maine Lobsterman Statue is relatively inconspicuous in its marina location along Washington, DC’s Anacostia Riverfront, in very close proximity to Arena Stage and the nation’s oldest United States Marine Corps Barracks. The statue was originally created by Portland, Maine, sculptor Victor Kahill as the centerpiece of Maine’s section in the Hall of States at the 1939 World’s Fair. Over time, four bronze castings have been made: 3 for locations in Maine and one for Washington, DC. The model for the sculpture was a genuine Maine lobsterman, H. Elroy Johnson of Bailey Island, who expressed regret that his faithful dog Bruin had not been incorporated into the final piece. Since Bruin’s puppyhood, he had only ever missed five days of accompanying his master to haul traps. Talk about intrepid! At the Fair’s unveiling of the sculpture, Bruin—who was said to be unerring in his ability to distinguish “shorts” from “counters” (e.g. non-regulation vs. regulation size lobsters)—was issued an official lobster license by the Commissioner of Sea and Shore Fisheries.

On the morning of the Intrepid Pup’s visit to the statue, few others were out along the waterfront promenade. However, we did encounter two women sitting on a park bench talking as their dogs played in the grass. It turns out that they lived in the nearby condominium complex and were very familiar with the lobsterman statue. The one lady remarked that the man in the sculpture bears a striking resemblance to a young Abraham Lincoln (and he does!) and therefore always refers to the statue as “Lincoln Freeing the Lobsters”!

Dogging the Details

38°52′32.01″ N,  77°1′16.55″ W
Maine Lobsterman Statue, Washington, DC

wag-a-meter set at 2The statue earns a 2 on the Wag-A-Meter both for its ease in experiencing and also for its interesting canine backstory!

While there is ample parking nearby, actually snagging a space can be a trick, especially during nice weather and busy weekends, because the area fills up with marina personnel, boat owners and people going to the nearby seafood restaurants. Fortunately, DC is very walkable, and if you’re up for a longer stroll with your dog, this Southwest DC location is accessible from the L’Enfant Plaza area and even the Jefferson Memorial area.